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5 PMS Myths Debunked

Updated: May 17

Like many other aspects concerning reproductive health, especially female reproductive health, there are a lot of stereotypes and myths that people take for the truth. One of these topics is premenstrual syndrome, widely referred to as PMS.

What is PMS really?

We’ve already covered that PMS stands for Premenstrual Syndrome and it basically manifests itself in a combination of both physical and emotional symptoms which appear 1-2 weeks before your period. The symptoms are caused by rising levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones. It’s estimated that 3 in 4 women experience some degree of premenstrual symptoms, some of it being moodiness, tender breasts, irritability, fatigue, food cravings, and bloating.

If we know all this then why do we still spread myths? Let’s debunk some of them.

#MYTH 1: All women experience PMS

Contrary to what many believe, not all women experience PMS! When waiting for your next period it’s easy to assume that all symptoms are PMS, and understandably so. But just because you experience premenstrual symptoms, it doesn’t mean it is premenstrual syndrome. Medically, symptoms that are from moderate to low intensity, are not considered PMS.

#MYTH 2: PMS refers to hormonal mood swings

PMS does not just manifest emotionally, but physically as well. It includes physical symptoms like cramps, tender breasts, joint pain, and/or insomnia. Funny enough, we can’t always point out the hormonal fluctuations as the reason for moodiness. Some experts actually believe that moodiness can also be a secondary symptom. For instance, bloating could make you irritable and lack of sleep would make you tired and cranky the next day. What could be seen as the core problem could only be the consequence of the symptom.


#MYTH 3: Blame everything on the PMS

It’s unfair to think that all your feelings and thoughts are irrational just because your period is around the corner. Simply put, you could have great ideas and valid feelings even when PMSing. Quite similarly, not all physical symptoms are PMS-related. Be sure to seek medical attention should you start to notice anything outside the ordinary.

#MYTH 4: Keep your partner away from you

It even sounds crazy just reading it. We do not recommend for you to think that since you're PMSing then you are bad news and everyone should keep their distance if they want to keep the peace. The most logical thing to do instead would be to track your symptoms with Grace and discuss them with your partner to best know how to address or deal with them when you get predictions.


#MYTH 5: There’s nothing you can do about it

Isn’t it great to learn that there’s in fact something that can be done? It may seem that PMS is something we have to live with or endure monthly, but in reality, there can be many ways to mediate it! #AskGrace for tips on PMS, so you can test and see what can help you manage your PMS. However, if your symptoms are preventing you from daily life and activities, then you might want to consult a doctor - who might recommend a change of diet, including supplements or even a change in your hormonal birth control- to help you out.


Hope this was helpful!

Stay informed, stay in control.

Do you experience PMS? What does that look like every month? Share with us in the comments.

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